Autumn Equinox BBQ Party

Another beautiful autumn day heralded a delightful Seed saving session, work day on the allotment with many chard seedlings planted out and ending with a relaxing Picnic, BBQ and  conversations that talked the sun down out of the sky.

Once again there were about 30 of us on the organic community allotment, with five children including baby Eve, the daughter of Su and Justin, who at 9 weeks old is our youngest daughter of the soil. She is as relaxed as her parents being able to sleep most nights! Wow ,what a strong case  for growing and eating organic food.

The pictures tell the story , a picnic to match any community picnic with new and old members coming together after the summer holidays.

Barcombe Farm Visit

About a dozen of us visited
Barcombe Organics, Mill Lane, Barcombe
for a couple of hours on  Saturday morning 6th August. It was a beautiful English summer’s day with an opportunity to see how organic gardening was done on a 10-acre farm , much of which was under polytunnels. It was a delight to see how the soil was so fertile and springy through the use of effective rotation of crops, green manures, and home made compost while avoiding any compacting, Somehow there were no slugs! We learnt how over 400 organic veggie boxed were sold each week; it’s not surprising with such fabulous and varied crops grown.
After wonderful hospitality, tea and cakes we retreated to Carolin’s smallholding to enjoy a picnic in the shady woods. We paid homage to the wildlife pond, the trusty steed, and the three rare breed pigs  while enjoying some of Sussex’s finest countryside and delightful hospitality.  Eat your hearts out if you did not make it, you missed a day to remember.

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Summer Party Celebrations

IMG_20160619_141355Our celebration to welcome in the warm season on Sunday the 19th June was a terrific success!

We had a delicious array of picnic dishes, two barbecues blazing, and an unusually forgiving day of weather. We were delighted to welcome new members, and those more seasoned, to come together and enjoy the Weald Allotment. It’s been a lot of work, but our plots (now converged into one super plot) are looking superb.

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Thanks to the 26 or so volunteers who came along to build fruit cages, strim, weed, and bring in a harvest of potatoes, broad beans, strawberries and more!

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Our Seedling Sale went down a treat!

It was an intermittently lovely day, with the cold winds and clouds permeated by spells of sun shine.

Regardless of this we had a fantastic time, selling a huge number of plants to raise funds for our organisation. The team was on hand to provide advice and information to the public, and we were joined by the food partnership too.

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Thanks to all those who came along to support us.

Happy growing!

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Beginners Guide To Indoor Seedlings

Growing Organic vegetables as a novice.

What you will need:

Seed Compost – New Horizon from Homebase is well reviewed

Seed Trays/Modules – with drainage holes and a tray to catch excess water

Lid – cling film or other plastic coverings also work

Water – rain water preferable due to pH variations in tap water

Organic Seeds – I used beetroot, kale and broccoli bought from Amazon

Labels – you can DIY with sticks, cellotape and paper. Or, 50 labelling sticks available from Poundland.

Method:

  1. Dampen the seed compost by mixing with some rain water in a bucket. Better to be on the dry side, I think mine was a bit soggy.
  2. Pour this compost into the seed tray but don’t push in as this will compact the soil – making harder work for the seeds
  3. Once the tray is full, tap against the table to settle the soil.

4. Labels your seed tray. Seedlings look almost identical, so if you don’t label them you wont stand a chance at knowing what’s growing where!

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5. Make depressions in the soil for the seeds to sit. A good rule of thumb is that depth should be twice that of the seed. Broccoil and Kale are about 1cm deep.

6. Sprinkle seeds into the depressions – usually about 1-2 per module. I may have got a bit carried away with the kale here, as the seeds are tiny and managed to get away from me! This caused a lot of pricking out weaklings.

7. Sprinkle with a little more compost, just to cover the seeds.

8. Cover – cling film works fine if you don’t have a plastic lid.IMG_4947

9. Leave in a warm space, preferably near a window and wait for germination. This depends on the type of seed. For the seeds I used it is about 1-2 weeks.

(Open the vents to allow for air circulation)

 

11/04/2016

The tray seemed too wet so I’ve uncovered this morning to prevent moisture problems – damping off etc. Putting lid back on tonight.

The Kale “Nero Di Toscana” is in the lead after only 3 days!

12/04/2016

Several seedlings sprouted in each module. I have pinched out the weaker looking ones, leaving only one per module. This removes the competition for nutrients and space.

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The kale and broccoli have come through, leaving only the beetroot which has a longer germination period.

Check the soil for moisture, rewater only if it drys out. Underwatering encourages strong roots which search for sustenance.

I will continue to keep the tray covered, rotating it daily to provide even light exposure.

13/04/2016

Potting on

What you will need:

Potting Compost/mix – mix your own, see details below.

Bucket

Rain Water

Stick to stir

Pots – Biodegradable preferable

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  1. You can move the seedlings to a larger container. Change container before roots become too established or they will be more prone to damage.

 

2. Use a potting mix/compost this time. This will provide the nutrients needed for growth.

I mixed my own, this can save money and provide a better result if done right.

  • 1 part Coconut Coir – soak in water (as per instructions)
  • 1 part perlite – I used organic rice husks
  • Potting compost – Organic Vermi Compost – To eye
  • Volcanic Rock Dust – Ebay (£4.99 per kg) – A couple handfuls

IMG_50073. Fill most of the way.

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4. Dig around your seedling to loosen it from the soil. Then, lift it by the leaves rather than the stem.

5. Place it in the pot and add more mix to secure it.

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6. Harden off – Gradually acclimatise your seedling to the outdoors by bringing it outside for increasing intervals.

17/04/2016

The seedlings are getting stronger, I’m bringing them out into the sun every day. They live indoors at night.

The beetroot has finally come through!IMG_5031

Progression of the new plot on the Weald Allotment.

Start

It looks like we’ll have our work cut out for us!

Allotment start

March

It’s cold, but a few of us are making a start on clearing junk and digging the beds.

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3/04/1016

First digging of the new beds is done. Apple trees are planted and the majority of the junk has been cleared. Good work volunteers!

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10.04.2016

Second digging of the community beds in South plot and the shed is cleared.

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17.04.2016

First earlies go in and measurements for the beds and paths are made.

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24.04.2016

Paths have been layed and beds are dug and weeded a final time in South plot. Makeshift cloches (tents) set-up in North plot. Phew! Time for some vegetables?

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01.06.2016

Individual beds were divided and paths laid in between.

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Next Events

Spring in Your Heels: City Gardening

 Saturday April 16th 2-4pm @ Phoenix community centre garden. TBC.

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The practical sequel to our highly successful Spring Is In The Air: Organic Sowing & Growing presentation which was held on the 5th April.

How to sow and grow vegetables and flowers with Ruth Urbanowicz (our own RHS qualified gardening expert). We continue with the basics of sowing, pricking out and potting on, hardening off and planting out.

Take home a baby tomato plant and some flower seeds to put that new found knowledge to use!

To be held in the newly refurbished courtyard garden at Phoenix Community Centre (to be confirmed and weather permitting).

For more details or to confirm your place please e-mail ruthurbanowicz@live.co.uk.

Free to all members or a suggested donation of £3.

Programme of Events 2016

Event  Day  Time  Place  
*Note Venue Change!*  

Container Growing for Small City Gardens 

Tuesday 15th March 7pm Albion  Clinic, 1 Albion St  BN2 9NE
*POSTPONED due to ongoing work at Phoenix Centre *Container Growing for Small City Gardens                      Practical  Session  Saturday 19th March 2pm -4pm
Practical Sowing and Growing for Beginners  Sunday 20th March 11am-1pm Weald Organic Community Allotment
Spring is in the Air – Sowing and Growing  Tuesday 5th April 7pm-9pm Phoenix Community Centre
Spring in your Heels – Practical Sowing and  Growing  Saturday 16th April 2pm-4pm Phoenix Garden
Seedling Swap (Members Only)  Sunday 8th May 11am-1pm Alan’s Plot Weald              Allotments
Seedling Sale  Sunday 15th May 11am-1pm Demonstration Garden in Preston Park
Practical Growing  Saturday 18th June 2pm-4pm Phoenix Garden
Organic Techniques and Summer Party  Sunday 19th June 11am –1pm Weald Organic Community Allotment
Seashore Foraging Walk  Sunday 3rd July 11am – 12:30pm Rottingdean Beach
West Dene Group Visit  July TBC TBC Westdene
Barcombe Farm Visit  August TBC Barcombe
Seed Saving Workshop  Sunday 18th September 11am-1pm Weald Organic Community Allotment
Harvest Supper and How did your Garden Grow Discussion  Saturday 29th October 6.30 pm Phoenix Community Centre
Interesting  Speaker (TBC)  Thursday 17th November 7pm Phoenix Community Centre
Christmas Feast and Gardening Quiz  Saturday 10th December 6.30pm Phoenix Community Centre
Solstice Celebration  Sunday 11th December 11am-1pm Weald Organic Community Allotment

 

 

 

 

Special Branch

Our friends at Special branch in Stanmer are again able to offer half price trees at 50p each, from January to April. The Trees available this year are Dogwood, Guelder Rose, and Wayfaring trees. These plants would provide the backbone for an excellent wildlife hedge. 20+ box plants(90cm+) for sale at £3 per plant. Great for a windbreak.

Special Branch  are a not-for-profit organisation, run entirely by voluntary workers, guaranteeing local origin for all their plants.

http://www.specialbranchtrees.org.uk/